(SA) Economy In Crisis: What The Year 2009 Holds For India?

    

The Global Recession 2009.The Year 2008 was dreadful for the Global Economy. It started small in the mid of 2007 and then it went global. This Economic crisis which some Economists observing it analogous to the “Great Depression in 1930s”. This crisis has affected all of us by number of ways. hundreds of thousands of jobs has been lost so far and still counting. The deteriorating US, Japan and the Euro Zone Economy impelling the Indian economy on the downside. The other developing economies are also not immune to this global downturn. Fastest developing nation – China fears, their economic growth should fall to even below 6% from 11.4% in 2007. Global equity markets also fell heavily due to major slump in the financial sector. Indian Equity markets have lost half of its total value since Jan, 2008 peak while the other major markets fell between 35% and 72% and still there is no signs of recovery in the global financial markets as the economic situation is continue to worsen. The recent Macro economic data from the United States shows the further deepening of Recession. Falling demand for crude oil lead to steepest fall and now trading at 4 year lowest levels.   

India’s Economic Story   

Inflation Rate in 2008

General Trend: Inflation Rate in 2008

Developing economies like Brazil, Russia, India and China (BRIC) are emerging as an economic powerhouse.  Since the year 2002, Indian Economy grew at an average rate of over 8%. The recent Financial Tsunami which led to the severe recession are also affecting the developing nations. Some of the major economic factors are now in favor of the Indian Economy. One of the vital positive changes are cooling inflation (see the picture on the left side, showing the Inflation trend), commodity prices, Crude oil prices, falling interest rates. RBI still have a lot of room to ease its policy rates further when the inflation below 1%. In the Year 2008, RBI had revised its key rates several times to maintain the liquidity in the banking system. The lower interest rates will allow the banks to cut their benchmark lending rates, though the deposits will also see the reduction in interest rates. Lower commodity prices and crude oil prices is driving the Inflation on a downside.  Lower inflation means, lower cost of credit, which drives the economy on the upside, however in first half of 2009 (H1-09), growth will slow significantly as Industrial production suffers from lower exports. (see the given below picture showing the IIP trend in FY2008).   

IIP Growth in FY2008-09

General Trend: IIP Growth in FY2008-09

The recent economic indicators – Index of Industrial Production (IIP) data showed the negative growth of the economy, the another negative point for the Indian economy is rising fiscal deficit. Fiscal deficit estimated at over 8% of the India’s annual gross domestic product (GDP) (see our latest Post: “Interim Budget 2009 Review” for more information) and 3rd Quarter Advance Tax data which is fell by 22% over the corresponding year. It shows that the profitability of the Indian corporate is lessening. The fact is, “we’re now in the middle of the Global Recession” and we’ll see some more drastic changes in the global economy. Besides these factors, other important factors are falling demand for Indian exports and depreciating Rupee which will widen the Current Account deficit is another cause of concern. India’s largest import product is Crude Oil and weaker domestic currency would make imports dearer, however the weaker currency will lead to higher demand for India’s exports, but as mentioned earlier, the global recession have a drastic impact on India too.   

What To Watch Out For   

  • Headline Inflation will continue to fall and some economies (particularly developed one) will see short period of Headline Deflation in H1 of 2009. Reason: rapidly falling inflation, asset prices, and credit crisis. 
  • Central banks in across the world will continue to ease their monetary policy in the next three to six months to impede the deeper downturn and the risk deflation outcome.
  • FY09 earnings in India and 1st quarter earnings in the US and Europe. Bank’s result would be the top priority for the global investors as their positive corporate earnings might be an advance indicator for an improvement in the credit market and whole banking system which has a lead role to damage the global economy.

In the coming three to six months, the economies are expected to continue to contract as the negative impact from the credit crisis, a further deepening of the housing slowdown, a backlash in Emerging Markets. The 1st Half of year 2009 is very crucial and by mid-2009, economies are expected to return to positive growth rates and a subsequent slow recovery will materialize during H2 next year. The US would be the first to recover followed by Asia. The positive effects from falling energy prices, monetary policy easing, and fiscal stimuli will definitely work.   

The Reason For Recovery In H2 2009    

  • First of all, the falling Crude Oil prices from almost $150 a barrel to below $50 a barrel. Higher commodity prices were the main driver for the economic downturn last year. Food and raw material prices followed suit push the inflation on the downside. The lower inflation will act as a tax relief significantly supporting consumer purchasing power during the coming months.
  • Further widespread easing of Monetary Policy. US Central Banker, Federal Reserve will implement the Zero Interest Rate Policy (ZIRP) in its Jan, 2009 meeting. European Central Bank (ECB), the central bank of Euro Zone will likely to cut aggressively. This will lead to fade in credit crisis and the economy will start to recover.

Forecast For India   

VMW expects, India to grow at 6.2% in FY09 and 6.1% in FY10. On the RBI policy front, RBI should cut interest rates further to fuel the economic growth; however the robust Foreign Exchange Reserves and the strong domestic demand will protect the Indian Economy from sharp downfall.   

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This VMW Research is Marked as “Superannuated” by the VMW Research Team and the content of this research is no longer in use in today’s economic context, however certain references and inferences in this research can be use.

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6 thoughts on “(SA) Economy In Crisis: What The Year 2009 Holds For India?

  1. i want the indian gdp bar diagram & graphs from various macroeconomic sectors 2006 to 2007 & 2007 to 2008 , ) Identify at least 4 macroeconomics activities undertaken by specified government during the last 1 year to overcome the recent economic recession

  2. Pingback: Economy In Crisis: What The Year 2009 Holds For India? « artNpeace

  3. Pingback: Economy In Crisis: What The Year 2009 Holds For India? « artNpeace

  4. Dear Friends,

    Although you will not read/hear about it for some years in the media, the top story of the year is that global crude oil production peaked in 2008.

    The media, governments, world leaders, and public should focus on this issue.

    Global crude oil production had been rising briskly until 2004, then plateaued for four years. Because oil producers were extracting at maximum effort to profit from high oil prices, this plateau is a clear indication of Peak Oil.

    Then in July and August of 2008 while oil prices were still very high, global crude oil production fell nearly one million barrels per day, clear evidence of Peak Oil (See Rembrandt Koppelaar, Editor of “Oil Watch Monthly,” December 2008, page 1) http://www.peakoil.nl/wp-content/uploads/2008/12/2008_december_oilwatch_monthly.pdf. Peak Oil is now.

    Credit for accurate Peak Oil predictions (within a few years) goes to the following (projected year for peak given in parentheses):

    * Association for the Study of Peak Oil (2007)

    * Rembrandt Koppelaar, Editor of “Oil Watch Monthly” (2008)

    * Tony Eriksen, Oil stock analyst and Samuel Foucher, oil analyst (2008)

    * Matthew Simmons, Energy investment banker, (2007)

    * T. Boone Pickens, Oil and gas investor (2007)

    * U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (2005)

    * Kenneth S. Deffeyes, Princeton professor and retired shell geologist (2005)

    * Sam Sam Bakhtiari, Retired Iranian National Oil Company geologist (2005)

    * Chris Skrebowski, Editor of “Petroleum Review” (2010)

    * Sadad Al Husseini, former head of production and exploration, Saudi Aramco (2008)

    * Energy Watch Group in Germany (2006)

    Oil production will now begin to decline terminally.

    Within a year or two, it is likely that oil prices will skyrocket as supply falls below demand. OPEC cuts could exacerbate the gap between supply and demand and drive prices even higher.

    Independent studies indicate that global crude oil production will now decline from 74 million barrels per day to 60 million barrels per day by 2015. During the same time, demand will increase. Oil supplies will be even tighter for the U.S. As oil producing nations consume more and more oil domestically they will export less and less. Because demand is high in China, India, the Middle East, and other oil producing nations, once global oil production begins to decline, demand will always be higher than supply. And since the U.S. represents one fourth of global oil demand, whatever oil we conserve will be consumed elsewhere. Thus, conservation in the U.S. will not slow oil depletion rates significantly.

    Alternatives will not even begin to fill the gap. There is no plan nor capital for a so-called electric economy. And most alternatives yield electric power, but we need liquid fuels for tractors/combines, 18 wheel trucks, trains, ships, and mining equipment. The independent scientists of the Energy Watch Group conclude in a 2007 report titled: “Peak Oil Could Trigger Meltdown of Society:”

    “By 2020, and even more by 2030, global oil supply will be dramatically lower. This will create a supply gap which can hardly be closed by growing contributions from other fossil, nuclear or alternative energy sources in this time frame.”

    With increasing costs for gasoline and diesel, along with declining taxes and declining gasoline tax revenues, states and local governments will eventually have to cut staff and curtail highway maintenance. Eventually, gasoline stations will close, and state and local highway workers won’t be able to get to work. We are facing the collapse of the highways that depend on diesel and gasoline powered trucks for bridge maintenance, culvert cleaning to avoid road washouts, snow plowing, and roadbed and surface repair. When the highways fail, so will the power grid, as highways carry the parts, large transformers, steel for pylons, and high tension cables from great distances. With the highways out, there will be no food coming from far away, and without the power grid virtually nothing modern works, including home heating, pumping of gasoline and diesel, airports, communications, and automated building systems.

    It is time to focus on Peak Oil preparation and surviving Peak Oil.
    http://survivingpeakoil.blogspot.com/
    http://www.peakoilassociates.com/POAnalysis.html

    Please be sure, you’re going to leave Vishal Mishra Web (VMW) after clicking on the given above link.

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